About us

flyPAD was developed by Pavel Itskov in the Behavior and Metabolism lab at the Champalimaud Neuroscience Programme together with the Michael Dickinson`s lab at University of Washington.

Pavel Itskov, MD, PhD


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Is a postdoctoral fellow in the Behavior and Metabolism lab at the Champalimaud Neuroscience Programme He received his degree in Medicine from Moscow Sechenov Medical Academy, but instead of saving human lives went on to do a PhD in Neuroscience at the Tactile Perception and Learning lab at SISSA, Trieste, Italy. Since 2011 he is working at the Champalimaud Neuroscience Programme, studying neuronal mechanisms of protein homeostasis and developing new tool to monitor and affect behavior of Drosophila. Google Scholar Profile Send me an email

Carlos Ribeiro, PhD


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Born in Basel, Switzerland, Carlos Ribeiro studied Bio II at the Biozentrum of the University of Basel and performed his diploma under the supervision of Dr. Markus Affolter and Prof. Walter Gehring studying how TGF-beta signaling and HOX transcription factors affect transcription in the Drosophila embryo. After graduating in 1999 he continued in the laboratory of Prof. Affolter for his PhD studies until 2003 where he used 3D time lapse imaging approaches in the living embryo to study the molecular and cellular mechanisms used to sculpt the tubular breathing network of the fruitfly. In 2004 he joined the laboratory of Barry Dickson at the IMP in Vienna, Austria, for his postdoctoral training where he first characterized Robo receptor trafficking in living Drosophila embryos and then became interested in decision making in the adult fly. Carlos Ribeiro became principal investigator of the Champalimaud Neuroscience Programme at the IGC in 2009. His laboratory studies how neuronal systems sense metabolic needs and modify neuronal processes to generate the correct behavioral decisions needed for the survival and reproduction of organisms. Google Scholar Profile Send me an email

Michael H Dickinson PhD


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Michael Dickinson received a Ph. D. in the Dept. of Zoology at UW in 1989. His dissertation project focused on the physiology of sensory cells on the wings of flies. It was this study of wing sensors that led to an interest in insect aerodynamics and flight control circuitry. He worked briefly at the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics in Tübingen, Germany, and served as an Assistant Professor in the Dept. of Anatomy at the University of Chicago in 1991. He moved to the University of California, Berkeley in 1996 and was appointed as the Williams Professor in the Department of Integrative Biology in 2000. From 2002 to 2010, he was the Esther and Abe Zarem Professor of Bioengineering at the California Institute of Technology. He currently holds the Benjamin Hall Endowed Chair in Basic Life Sciences at UW. Dickinson’s awards include the Larry Sandler Award from the Genetics Society of America, the Bartholemew Award for Comparative Physiology from the American Society of Zoologists, a Packard Foundation Fellowship in Science and Engineering, and the Quantrell award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching at the University of Chicago. In 2001, he was awarded a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship. In 2008, he was inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Google Scholar Profile

Jose-Maria Moreira


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Is a Master student at the Istituto Superior Technico doing his master project in the Behavior and Metabolism lab at the Champalimaud Neuroscience Programme.

Ekaterina Vinnik, MD, PhD


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Is a postdoctoral fellow in the Behavioral Neuroscience and Circuit Dynamics and Computation labs at the Champalimaud Neuroscience Programme. She received his degree in Medicine from Moscow Sechenov Medical Academy, but instead of saving human lives went on to do a PhD in Neuroscience in the lab of Evan Balaban at SISSA, Trieste, Italy. Since 2011 he is working at the Champalimaud Neuroscience Programme, studying neuronal mechanisms of working memory in the prefrontal cortex of rats.

Goncalo Lopes


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Is a PhD student in the International Neuroscience Doctoral Programme at the Champalimaud Neuroscience Programme Goncalo developed a wonderful Bonsai environment and is trying to understand intelligent systems.

Steve Safarik


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Is an electrical engineer currently works at the UW in the Dickinson Lab where is developing hardware and software for the researchers in the lab to perform experiments and for other related purposes.

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